First For The Kids

14 weeks…

 

Yuppers… welcome to week 4 on the IV!

 

It’s gone from an annoyance to just a part of life.

 

At this point, all our immediate families know… We were timid about it, not really sure how everyone would handle it.  Especially the IV situation.

 

The kids had a day off school, and I happened to schedule my 14 week appointment for that day.  So my husband and I brought the kids with us to hear the baby’s heartbeat.

 

Usually, my doctor is pretty steady with getting their patients in.  I arrived, checked in, gave my urine sample like every visit, and waited.  And waited.  And waited.  It was 90 minutes before I was called in to the examine room.  My weight went up, but it was all water weight from the last 90 minutes of just sitting.  We checked again after a potty break – only a 2 lb increase from my last visit.  Still under my pre-pregnancy weight.  Yay.  😦

 

It was such a great moment for my husband and I to hear that baby’s heartbeat, knowing that baby is ok.  And it was great for our kids to hear it too.  We hadn’t really come right out and told our 5 year old son that I was pregnant, but we’d been prepping him.  After the heartbeat was echoing in the room, we told him.  The most priceless moment was him saying “I want a baby brother.”  It didn’t even seem to bother him that he wasn’t going to be the baby any more.

 

I began to feel movements around 15 weeks.  It was subtle, but as it is the 4th time around, I knew what  to be “looking” for.  I know my kids were eager to feel the baby, and would say that they could feel it, but I wasn’t quite sure that they did.  Either way, they developed a connection to the baby.

Lonely

Week 13…

The only places I’ve gone in the last few weeks have been work and the doctor’s office.

I miss people.

Don’t get me wrong, I love my husband and kids, but I use to go to networking events a few times a month.  I use to go walk around the mall just because.  I use to have nights out with friends.

One week before the PICC line was put in we had a game night with friends from work.  It was nice.  The kids were well-behaved, we got to enjoy some laughs and I didn’t get sick until we got home!  (However the next day wasn’t as kind…)

I haven’t been to church in weeks… my kids really miss it, too.  Steve has been training at his new job, so he hasn’t been able to take them.  Does anyone even notice that we’re not there?

We haven’t made our “Facebook Official” post yet, so I can’t vent publicly.  But I’m so lonely.  Part of me wants to ask my husband to take a day off with me and send the kids with a baby sitter, and just spend the day with me, no responsibilities.  But he needs to work, we need to save up for my maternity leave.

I’ve been invited to a few “direct sales” parties.  But I don’t want to have to bring my stupid backpack with me, and then deal with the fear of getting sick at my friend’s house.

Hormones are a pain, too.  It doesn’t help feeling lonely because of the isolation that the condition forces you into, to then be overly emotional while it’s happening.  Really, does anyone notice that I’ve been hiding?  Does anyone care?

Kids’ last soccer practices… one of the few times I left the house

 

Two Teeth in One Day

My youngest child (for now), my little man, my premie baby.  He’s all grown up now, he’s lost his 2 front teeth.   Less than 10 hours apart.

I woke up to my kids screaming; I thought something was wrong.  Pregnant women don’t usually move as quickly as I did.  So they came running to me.  And there it was, my little guy, holding his first baby tooth.

When his sisters lost their teeth, they were loose for over a month.  The adult teeth were actually growing in behind the baby teeth (it was actually kinds weird, I’d never seen that before.)  And they lost their first (and second) tooth just around their 6th birthdays

But for him, a few days of wigglers, and it was out.  He said he touched it with his tongue and it just fell out.  A whole month earlier than his sisters did.

At dinner that night, I asked him how his other tooth felt.  It was barely hanging on.  So I told him to get me a tissue.  I didn’t even have to pull.  It just fell out.

So now, my baby boy, my sickly little premie, my first child to need stitches and surgery, is without his front teeth.

 

Dealing With Mean Girls

Third Grade

That’s when it really started for me.  Something about 8 and 9-year-old kids, especially girls, that this age is when they try to test the power of control over others.

I’d experienced it for myself, and now I’m starting to see it affecting my daughter.

I’d been made fun of for the clothes that I wore, how long my hair was, my slight Boston accent, stupid petty things.  And yet, it really affected me.  No matter how hard I’d try to ignore it, I couldn’t avoid it.  It continued through junior high and high school; I couldn’t avoid it.

And now it’s my daughter’s turn.  She was telling us about a situation, and she told us she tried to talk to the girl, but it sounded like she was trying to dish it back, and failing at it.  She was being made fun of because of how she wears her hair, and because she did Bible Quizzing.

I sat and talked with her, trying not to cry.  I told her that just because that girl might like the headbands with lots of sparkles and big bows, doesn’t mean she has to.  They don’t stay in her hair very well.  And if it’s “too long” (as I was often teased for), maybe she’s jealous because her mom cuts her hair short.  My daughter has hair that most women swoon over, asking to borrow her for a little while to take to their colorist so they can get color just like hers.

My daughter is not athletic… she’s tried sports, but they’re just not her thing.  She’s not a bad runner though, but she doesn’t want to be a runner.  She likes music and reading.  I’m not going to force her into team sports unless she wants to try it.  But she loves Bible Quizzing.  She’s proud of the work that she’s done.  But in a public school, she doesn’t get an opportunity to share her experiences and talents.  Other kids who aren’t active in a church don’t see this as a real activity.  She should be proud of her hard work, and even if the kids at school don’t recognize her accomplishments, I know many parents who are.

As she was getting ready for school today, I told her that if someone is trying to say something to bring you down, just walk away.  If they continue bothering you, and it’s hard to ignore them, just pray for them; because even if they don’t seem likable at that moment, Jesus still loves them.

As a mom, who was in her shoes, I just want to protect her.  But most importantly, I need to let her grow and handle things on her own.

Have you had to deal with mean girls?  How did you deal with it?

Our First Surgery

My little guy was the first of my kids to need a procedure done.

He had his adenoids out a few days ago, though we’ve been planning for this for a couple of months (delayed due to weather and pregnancy issues.)

Aside from his awful snoring, and possible sleep apnea, his speech and hearing was greatly affected by the 85% blockage his adenoids had caused.  We’d been slowly preparing him for this day, calling it a procedure, and not a surgery.  I don’t know why, that just sounded better to us.  When we did use the word “surgery,” it was our daughters who freaked out, not him.

The night before we let him stay up to hydrate and snack.  I think he outlasted daddy, who fell asleep on the couch at 10,  Steven went to bed shortly after.  The next morning, we let him stay in bed until we had to go, we didn’t want to have to worry about him asking for breakfast.  But he didn’t, thankfully.

He brought his favorite puppy with him, and when we were checking in, they even gave puppy a wrist band.  He hated having to put on the hospital pajamas, and when they said he couldn’t wear his underwear, just incase he had an accident, he asked if he had to wear a baby diaper (so cute).

The nurses all adored him.  Anytime someone new came in the room, they’d ask “Can you tell me you’re whole name?” and all giggled when he did… something about the way he said “The Third” I think.  The anesthesiologist came in to talk with us, again, he was quite impressed with how thorough the answers to his questions Steven gave him.

The anesthesiologist gave me some advice regarding the baby… he could see I was having contractions.  When I told him I was only 31 weeks he explained why the steroid shots are good, and that if I can make it past at least 32 weeks, baby will be perfectly fine.  He filled it with a lot of technical stuff, which I tried to look like I was listening to, but I was here for Steven today.

Steven started to freak out a bit after all the nurses left, and then he heard “Dr. Duck.”  Dr. Merrill was absolutely fabulous, and made Steven feel so much better.  And me, for that matter.  I hated saying goodbye to my guy, but I knew he was in good hands.

And quick hands too.  The procedure was done in less than 20 minutes.  I was so anxious to see him.  I guess when it was over and they stopped the anesthesia, he woke up and freaked out.  So they gave him more “giggle gas” to calm him down.

When they brought me to him, he looked so sad.  The nurses were trying to feed him a mashed up popsicle, but he didn’t want it.  He just wanted to go home.  And he was mad that there was no TV – the nurses told him in pre-op that he could watch TV.

He got sick as he was being wheeled out to the car, which I was afraid of.  But also kinda glad it didn’t happen in the car.

He just relaxed and watched cartoons for a few hours, we both napped for a bit (stressful day for a pregnant mom).  When he woke up, with the exception of a raspy voice, he was almost normal.  I took the advice of friends and programmed his Tylenol/Motrin doses for every 3 hours, on the dot, and that seemed to keep any pain away.  He wasn’t 100%, but was playing with his toys, and looking at books and moving around just fine.

Two days later, not so much.  I really wanted to take my daughters to their JBQ tournament (Thank you Dillingham Family!), but due to my condition and Steven, hubby wouldn’t let me take the almost 4 hour drive.  Which, as much as I hated it, ended up being a good thing.  Poor guy did not have a good morning, and refused to get out of bed for several hours.  I kept up with his meds, but it took a while to get him up and going.

Now, therapy foods:  Room temperature definitely worked best for him.  I had purchased PediaSure, pudding and Jell-o, as well as Go-Gurts and Ice-Pops.  He really only wanted the pudding, Jell-o and PediaSure.  Oh, and my Shakes from New-Trition (though I made him his own at home without ice).  He really wanted a grilled cheese sandwich, but I was told not to let him eat until day 4 or 5.  He didn’t like that so much.

We went in to this procedure knowing that his adenoids were huge, and that was affecting the number, and severity, of his ear infections, which in turn affected hearing and speech.  Within the first day, we noticed improvements.  The first time I heard him say “Samantha” and not “Saman-ta” I almost cried.

Thanks again to Dr. Merrill for taking such amazing care of my son.

My Issues with Common Core Curriculums

Common Core

It’s a phrase that most parents I know have come to dread.

I understand that it’s just a level of standards that they children need to learn by the end of the year, and how the teachers teach it is their discretion.

However…  The programs that appear to have been made available to the teachers are, in my honest opinion, ridiculous.

I’m annoyed at the fact that my daughters rarely come home with homework.  They can’t build a study routine when they don’t have studying to do.  We limit screen time, so these practice websites are not my top choice.  I purchased math workbooks to supplement, but it’s not enough.  And when they do come home with homework, we are overwhelmed with questions, because it’s a printed page, and there is no text-book to help them find the answers.

My biggest critique is of this math program; it doesn’t cater to my eldest daughter’s learning style.  2+2=4.  It always will.  She hates having to learn all these other devices to come up with the same answer.   And the terminology they want the kids to learn.  It’s all “grouping;” not carrying over or borrowing.  If you want to make it make sense, use terms that a kid will understand.

My eldest is learning multiplication now.  I don’t remember learning it until the fourth grade, she’s in third.  But some of the stuff she’s brought home looks like algebra, which isn’t a bad thing, necessarily.  But the problems are written poorly:

2 x 2 + 2 = __

So, does anyone see the problem with this question?

(2 x 2) + 2  = 6

2 x (2 + 2)  = 8

So which is it that they’re asking for?  I had her write it both ways… A week later, I haven’t seen the graded assignment, so I don’t know which was the answer they were looking for.

Then we get things like this:

This is a practice test.  There is no explanation that each X=1 “creature.”  Then, what if the child doesn’t know that an ant has 6 legs or the spider has 8 legs, because they haven’t covered insects in science.

For my husband to see homework like this and say “Maybe it is time to look into private school,” it’s serious.

I know from the parent-teacher conferences a few months ago that their teachers aren’t happy with this curriculum, but don’t mind the standards.  Both my girls have exhibited exceptionally high standardized test scores (which is what schools ALL ABOUT, right?) and read/comprehend 2 grade levels above where they are.

But they are bored; not feeling challenged, but confused by the “silly work.”

Seriously, though… homeschooling and private school are starting to look a lot better now…

Dr. PetPlay is in the House

We recently got a few new iPad games for our kids, that had been free during the Christmas Season.

Dr. PetPlay was one of these games (usually $2.99).

My middle child loves animals (especially cats) and would like to be a vet when she grows up.  So this game was PERFECT for her.  And her enormous collection of stuffed animals made for a full waiting room.

The kids have spent their days being snowed in taking care of their animals.  I was doing some work when I heard an awful cry coming from “The Doctor’s Office.”  It was my son.  And his beloved puppy Shadow (named after my parent’s dog) had not one, but two broken legs!  Thank you creators of Dr. PetPlay for that image for my son.

The tears on his face were real, and the sadness in his voice.  But Dr. Emmalee told him that with some band aids and rest, puppy would be all better.

We’ve recently been bombarded with animals who needed homes, temporary and permanent.  After the snowstorm left an animal shelter without heat, my heart broke and I wanted to help.  But I also know the kids wouldn’t want to give the animal back, and we’re not really in a place to be taking in any animals, especially cats or untrained puppies.

So we’ll continue on with the stuffed animals, and visiting adopt-a-thons, waiting for that time when a pet will be a part of our family…. many, many years from now.